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Dept. of Wildlife: Animals more active than usual this fall

Instances of Animal/Vehicle collisions in Vermont tend to rise in the Fall/Winter season.
Instances of Animal/Vehicle collisions in Vermont tend to rise in the Fall/Winter season.(WCAX)
Published: Oct. 16, 2020 at 10:41 PM EDT
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BARRE, Vt. (WCAX) - A woman hit a black-bear with her car Wednesday evening driving home on I-89. Susan Law was driving home that evening when she saw a large black figure out of the corner of her eye near the Williston exit.

Before she could react, her car hit and killed a black bear on the side of the hood.

She says she’s thankful game wardens were able to locate the bear.

“It’s always something that I have in the back of my mind, being in Vermont to lookout for wildlife,” Law said. “Unfortunately in this situation, the bear was just too fast for me to do anything.”

Director of Wildlife for Vermont Fish & Wildlife Mark Scott says there’s usually an increase in wild animals being hit by cars in the fall, but says this year’s drought has made it worse.

With less available food, more animals are up and moving around the state to find food, especially animals that are close to hibernation.

“This year is very similar to 2016 where we had hardly any fall foods,” Scott said. “Given that, we had one-hundred and fifty bears killed on the highway in 2016, we suspect we might be on par for that this year, unfortunately.”

The Department of Fish and Wildlife urges drivers to be aware of surroundings on the roadway, and if they spot wildlife, to slow down in the event one or more animals dart out onto the road.

Copyright 2020 WCAX. All rights reserved.

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